October Plan

Home Practice

I’ve read a handful of yoga books that have some sequences in them that I’ve marked with sticky notes but never done (or only halfheartedly done). So this month I want to do the following practices from the following books:

From Yoga for Your Type: An Ayurvedic Approach to Your Asana Practice by David Frawley and Sandra Summerfield:

  • Pitta Reducing Instant Change Program, Level II (pp. 209-211)

From The Woman’s Book of Yoga & Health by Linda Sparrowe and Patricia Walden:

  • Woman’s Energizing Sequence (pp. 26-41)
  • Sequence for Healthy Menstruation (pp. 100-104)
  • Sequence for Enhanced Immunity (pp. 125-131)

From Yoga Sequencing: Designing Transformative Yoga Classes by Mark Stephens:

  • Sequence 35: Yoga for Easing Menstrual Discomfort (pp. 246-247)
  • Sequence 55: Muladhara Chakra Class (pp. 297-299)
  • Sequence 63: Pitta Balancing Class (pp. 322-323)

Ashtanga Yoga: The Practice Manual by David Swenson

  • Short Form - 45 minutes (pp. 258-259

2014 Fall Yoga Immersion

I’m a week into this e-course and loving it. Working on doing a little each day or every few days instead of cramming it all into Saturday (like I did with Week 1). We’ve also got a book club starting up. Carrie’s passion is infectious, so it’s sort of a “fake it ‘til you make it” attitude over here, and it’s working out splendidly. Every week I’ve got some asana to do, some pranayama, some meditation, some yoga nidra… Basically I just need someone to run my life.

Self-Care

  • detox bath per week (I can’t believe I’m not sick yet)
  • reintroduce dry brushing (just ‘cause it feels good)
  • neti pot once a week

Year Goals:

  • $186.82 loan payment
  • Gratitude journal every day
  • Yoga journal every practice

September Recap

Month Goals:

  • 1 self-led practice per week (check)
  • 600 minutes of yoga (922 minutes… mostly breathing)
  • #Freeyogis September Yoga Challenge (so much fun!)
  • The Desire Map workbook

I bit off more than I could chew this month, and as it approached the last weekend in September, I realized… I wasn’t really interested in doing it. Just now, that is. When I started the Fall Yoga Immersion e-course (see below), I realized I wanted to focus more on being content here before I started exploring where I was going to go next. So that might be put on hold until December or maybe January 1.

I didn’t exactly start this on the fall equinox (as intended), but I got caught up on the first week and discovered… I can actually journal. Kind of. That’s not true. I can. I filled a whole page, which was surprising. So I’m really excited to continue this for a few more weeks and after that dive in to all the books from the recommended readings I downloaded to my Kindle like the glutton I am.

  • Breathing three times a day (I hit it most days with a couple of days where I only did twice a day. Still, say heck yes to deep breathing.)

Year Goals:

  • $186.82 loan payment (check)
  • Gratitude journal every day (check)
  • Yoga journal every practice (check)

Day 30 of #freeyogis: #reflect. My asana practice has been almost non-existent this month, but I realized in a discussion of “sacred spaces” that I’ve been spending a lot of time in this corner just being, and that’s okay. Yoga isn’t always about movement, and I think I really started to understand that these last few weeks. Thank you, @bexmaddy, for getting me on board with this challenge in the first place. Have a lovely October with #posebypose!

Day 30 of #freeyogis: #reflect. My asana practice has been almost non-existent this month, but I realized in a discussion of “sacred spaces” that I’ve been spending a lot of time in this corner just being, and that’s okay. Yoga isn’t always about movement, and I think I really started to understand that these last few weeks. Thank you, @bexmaddy, for getting me on board with this challenge in the first place. Have a lovely October with #posebypose!

Seriously though. #friends #pizza #pizzaunderstands

Seriously though. #friends #pizza #pizzaunderstands

Day 29 of #freeyogis: #burning. A little firelog pose for the metaphor. #yoga

Day 29 of #freeyogis: #burning. A little firelog pose for the metaphor. #yoga

Just did one of those yoga practices where it’s hard to join the real world after.

Plot twist: it was self led.

Anonymous said: On a subject related to your "fall detox" (which sounds lovely!), at least in the sense of trying to refresh/get back to/establish better habits, etc.... I'm trying to stay in touch better with those with whom I'm close personally but not geographically! I love my family and friends, but often go longer than I intend without sending notes/emails/calls/etc. Are you good at keeping in touch, and if so, do you have any tips you'd be willing to pass along? Thank you much, and happy fall! :)

If there is anything I’m good at, it’s long-distance relationships. I’ve had close to eighteen years of experience :) So, in no particular order:

  • Carve out time for your non-proximal relationships. For instance, my weekend to-do list includes getting two letters done. It’s not a burden or a responsibility; it’s just necessary when we live several hundred miles away.
  • Find something you love to write on. I have a huge stationery collection thanks to my mom (who buys me some every year for my birthday), but I also found two cute boxes of cards on clearance at Target on Friday and a super cute greeting card while I was waiting for my coffee… And pretty cards don’t belong in boxes—they belong in other people’s mailboxes!
  • Use whatever you have on hand. I responded to a letter while I was bored at work, so I wrote on lined paper with my pink grading pen. She responded with yellow legal pad paper. Make it work. Five minutes to kill while the oven is preheating? Shoot off a “hope you have a nice day” text. One of my friends does that regularly, and I swear she has a sixth sense for when I really just need a “hey, thinking of you” message.
  • Do whatever you used to do long-distance. As many people know, I have been working my way through too many cycles of America’s Next Top Model. I’ve been doing it with a friend I’ve known for almost twenty years who moved away ten years ago. We used to have crazy movie marathon nights together, so we schedule time where we call each other on the phone and sync up a movie and talk on the phone as if we’re sitting on the couch together. And this time is sacred—you don’t take other calls or cancel halfway through, no more than you would if you were hanging out with someone.
  • Technology is your friend. My best friend and I haven’t lived in the same state since we were 10. Thank goodness for What’s App and Skype! We could text like we were in the same time zone, and once a month or so we would schedule a video chat that would last for hours so we could catch up on the crazy stories that didn’t translate well over email. The only thing that keeps me from getting rid of Facebook is that I message one of my friends from college on there all the time. Yeah, we could text… but we Facebook chat. That’s just our thing.
  • Don’t take it personally if times goes by. With all the demands on our time that are literally in our faces, it’s easy to let a call go to voicemail until you have time to really talk… and then have it be two weeks later. Or leave a letter on your desk unanswered… for a month. This is not to say that we shouldn’t make our long-distance family and friends priorities, but it does take more scheduling than meeting for coffee on a Saturday morning.

That was really long, but I’m not going to edit it. I think we’re losing the art of the written word. There’s just something about taking the time to communicate that, I think, beats all the together-time in the world. I wish you luck, and happy fall to you, too. I’m off to write a letter :)

Day 28 of #freeyogis: #care. This weekend was the start of my fall detox, and it always begins with my physical space. All the linens get washed, all the surfaces get cleaned, and if it can be treated with baking soda and/or vinegar (and lavender oil), it does. I got 22 things on my list done yesterday, and I started this morning with the hardest: grocery shopping. But I treated myself to a cinnamon dulce latte and some flowers. Just because. Happy fall. #flowers #coffee #home

Day 28 of #freeyogis: #care. This weekend was the start of my fall detox, and it always begins with my physical space. All the linens get washed, all the surfaces get cleaned, and if it can be treated with baking soda and/or vinegar (and lavender oil), it does. I got 22 things on my list done yesterday, and I started this morning with the hardest: grocery shopping. But I treated myself to a cinnamon dulce latte and some flowers. Just because. Happy fall. #flowers #coffee #home

Day 27 of #freeyogis: #smile. It’s kind of a smile? If you squint? (I never should have attempted to be clever with a backbend.) All caught up now. You can go about your day. With a smile! #yoga

Day 27 of #freeyogis: #smile. It’s kind of a smile? If you squint? (I never should have attempted to be clever with a backbend.) All caught up now. You can go about your day. With a smile! #yoga

Day 26 of #freeyogis: #balance. I wanted to know if side eagle was possible. It is. #yoga

Day 26 of #freeyogis: #balance. I wanted to know if side eagle was possible. It is. #yoga

Day 24 of #freeyogis: #calming. I dare you to name a pose more calming than forward fold. Ha, you can’t! (Just kidding: savasana. But seriously, you want to shut down my flight-or-fight response, fold me in half.) #yoga

Day 24 of #freeyogis: #calming. I dare you to name a pose more calming than forward fold. Ha, you can’t! (Just kidding: savasana. But seriously, you want to shut down my flight-or-fight response, fold me in half.) #yoga

Day 23 of #freeyogis: #forward. Turns out moving forward requires taking your shoulder back. It is no secret that, after my back, my shoulders are one of the tightest parts of my body. It is also no secret that any pose that has you standing six inches away from the wall is probably going to open your shoulders. So it’s no wonder that I started to panic a little when I was doing a practice called Balance from @carriehensley_com and she moves to the wall. I was cool holding my arm at 12:00. 1:00… eh, fine. 2:00? Hell no. I started getting queasy, and when the cue came for 3:00 I was internally freaking out. Except… my breathing was fine. Believe it or not, I was not actually dying. I wasn’t even in pain. It was just uncomfortable. So I breathed through it, and the second side would have gone better if it weren’t the tighter of the two. Still, that’s progress for me. #yoga #sacredsanghaonlineyogastudio

Day 23 of #freeyogis: #forward. Turns out moving forward requires taking your shoulder back. It is no secret that, after my back, my shoulders are one of the tightest parts of my body. It is also no secret that any pose that has you standing six inches away from the wall is probably going to open your shoulders. So it’s no wonder that I started to panic a little when I was doing a practice called Balance from @carriehensley_com and she moves to the wall. I was cool holding my arm at 12:00. 1:00… eh, fine. 2:00? Hell no. I started getting queasy, and when the cue came for 3:00 I was internally freaking out. Except… my breathing was fine. Believe it or not, I was not actually dying. I wasn’t even in pain. It was just uncomfortable. So I breathed through it, and the second side would have gone better if it weren’t the tighter of the two. Still, that’s progress for me. #yoga #sacredsanghaonlineyogastudio

Day 22 of #freeyogis: #funkypose. I’m trying to get my core back, and it seemed only fair to funkify plank to do it. Mission accomplished. (Sorry in advance for all the forthcoming pictures. “Catch up on Freeyogis” is on the to-do list, and everyone knows I can’t resist to-do lists.) #yoga

Day 22 of #freeyogis: #funkypose. I’m trying to get my core back, and it seemed only fair to funkify plank to do it. Mission accomplished. (Sorry in advance for all the forthcoming pictures. “Catch up on Freeyogis” is on the to-do list, and everyone knows I can’t resist to-do lists.) #yoga

Yoga after a nap is hard. That was bad planning on my part.

Peasants seldom write letters, and for my father the arrival of a letter was an important ceremony that entailed quite a ritual: the glass of wine for the postman, the close scrutiny of his name on the envelope—mistakes can happen, and you must never open a letter that isn’t addressed to you—and then the blade of the knife carefully inserted to liberate whatever the fates had in store.

Maurice Mességué, Of People and Plants: The Autobiography of Europe’s Most Celebrated Healer, pp. 28-29